Month: July 2020

Gardening a great way to stay active when your’re stuck at home

Originally from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/UrbanOrganicGardener/~3/Uw_-gts7alk/

Being stuck at home doesn’t mean you have to stay inside – the current spring weather is perfect for working on the landscape and doing some gardening.

Gardening is a great way to get fresh air, exercise, stay productive, and grow some of your own food.

Herbs, in particular, are great to have in the landscape for many reasons – they are beautiful ornamental plants, attract butterflies and bees, and they can be used for seasoning to make food taste delicious.

Another bonus is that many herbs are deer-resistant!

There are herbs to try for every level of experience, from beginner gardener to advanced.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.gosanangelo.com/story/news/2020/03/22/gardening-great-way-stay-active-when-stuck-home/2884284001/

Peas and Quiet: Urban Gardening in the Time of Covid-19

Originally from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/UrbanOrganicGardener/~3/J5t-mAU9aQY/

Access to community gardens has been limited during the pandemic, but people have been reaching out to gardeners and gardening organizations far and wide to learn how to grow their own food… Photo courtesy of King County Parks, Washington.

Urban gardening has taken on a renewed relevance as the coronavirus has declared war on us from Los Angeles to New Orleans; Seattle to Saint Louis. People are reaching out to organizations far and wide about how to grow their own food for a wide array of reasons: concern about food supply chain vulnerabilities, frightened of going to the grocery store for lettuce they could potentially grow themselves, eager to be more self-sufficient or looking to help their neighborhood by donating food to local food banks.

“We need to open our hearts and connect with the struggles of those most vulnerable.” That connection, Fredie believes, can involve carrots, corn, kale, and more. It’s a refrain heard from gardeners across the country. “I think we’ll come out of this,” notes Margee Green, the executive director of Sprout NOLA, a farmer and gardener training program based in New Orleans, “with a lot more people understanding the sacrifices that farm workers make every day and the importance of supporting agriculture that is in harmony with nature, and closer to them.”

READ THE FULL STORY AT: https://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/articles/entry/peas-and-quiet-urban-gardening-in-the-time-of-covid-19/

New urban gardens sprout amid coronavirus, aiming to feed N.J. cities

Originally from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/UrbanOrganicGardener/~3/fPXaRdX8yTk/

Trenton, a city of nearly 85,000 people, contains only one full-service supermarket. It is one New Jersey’s several food deserts, where access to groceries — let alone fresh produce — is scarce.

Now, as the coronavirus pandemic has provided some with more free time and plunged many more into poverty, local community groups and residents are getting their hands dirty to address the problem.

Urban gardens have experienced a boom in community interest and participation in recent months — more people are learning new skills, connecting with their neighbors and, importantly, helping to fill nutritional needs.

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Growing Miniature White Cucumbers from Seed in Fall? Maybe.

Originally from http://inmykitchengarden.blogspot.com/2012/09/growing-miniature-white-cucumbers-from.html

You can read more about growing these cute little crunchy cucumbers in my previous post, Easy to Grow from Seed Favorites: Miniature White Cucumbers.

Realization of the Day:
This is shaping up to be the year of experimental fall planting.

I generally have pretty good luck growing cucumbers. Between my own harvests (lemon cucumbers are another favorite or mine to grow) and the excess bounty purchased from my Amish friends, I haven't bought a supermarket cucumber in years.

This past spring I started three varieties of cucumber seeds in flats, and for various reasons (the main one being that I probably didn't plant the seeds deep enough and they washed away when I watered them—yeah, duh) I didn't end up with any cucumber plants. Then, again for various reasons, I never got around to starting any more cucumber seeds directly in the ground once the soil had warmed up.

Thankfully some other gardeners around here fared better than I did in the cucumber department, and I was able to buy some nice ones (along with some really bitter ones). But because of the heat and drought (which is what made those bitter ones bitter), the local front yard pop-up produce stands closed down almost as soon as they opened up this year.

Fast forward a couple of months to a desperate me, trying to work on some new summer recipes. I finally broke down and bought some supermarket cucumbers. Blech.

I've already direct seeded two of my 4'x8' raised beds with cool season crops—something I've never done as early as August before—and on a whim, I also stuck half a dozen miniature white cucumber seeds into a bare spot in the homemade greenhouse. A couple of days later, four of them sprouted.

More below. . .

Click here for the rest of this post »

Urban Farming: A Budding Investment Opportunity in Real Estate

Originally from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/UrbanOrganicGardener/~3/0VvZs3Lk7OQ/

As the demand for sustainable and locally sourced produce in urban areas increases, so does the chance to be a part of the solution. Urban farming, a new development in real estate, brings an opportunity for investors to profit by transforming commercial real estate into urban gardens.

The growing demand for urban farms

Environmentally aware consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about where their food is coming from and the impact our current food production system has on the earth.

On average, food travels 1,000 to 2,000 miles before reaching supermarket shelves, resulting in about 20 to 30 percent of food loss occurring during the transportation process.

According to the Natural Defense Resource Council, the average American meal is sourced from five foreign countries using multiple methods of transportation — resulting in food with lower nutritional value and more carbon emissions being released into the atmosphere.

With heightened consumer awareness of these facts, especially in urban areas, buyers are increasingly seeking local produce grown in a more sustainable, eco-friendly way.

READ THE FULL STORY: https://www.fool.com/millionacres/real-estate-investing/articles/urban-farming-budding-investment-opportunity-real-estate/

Ron Finley’s gardening MasterClass will teach you how to grow food ; change your life

Originally from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/UrbanOrganicGardener/~3/L1xRqjTKgOQ/

MasterClass.com

If you want to learn to grow your own food, there’s no better teacher than Ron Finley. Lucky for you, he now offers a MasterClass on gardening — and shared some tips to take to heart.

While California is one of the nation’s leaders in agricultural output, smog-cloaked and concrete-coated Los Angeles is hardly considered representative of the Golden State’s verdancy. But don’t tell that to South Central L.A. native Ron Finley, who in 2010 embarked on a guerrilla gardening project by growing food on the humble strip of soil sitting adjacent to the sidewalk in front of his house. Despite objection from local authorities, Finley persevered with his groundbreaking initiative, and the legend of the Gangsta Gardener was born.

TAKE AN ONLINE GARDENING CLASS NOW: https://www.masterclass.com/classes/ron-finley-teaches-gardening?utm_source=Paid&utm_medium=Affiliate&utm_term=Aq-Prospecting&sscid=61k4_2zswy

 

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